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Running Reins & Draw Reins

Running Reins & Draw Reins

Draw reins are classic auxiliary reins. Used correctly they make an important contribution to the basic training of both horse and rider. The running reins are similar in structure to the draw reins, but belong to the so-called corrective reins.
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Triangle reins and draw reins as auxiliary reins 

The name auxiliary reins already suggests their function. Triangle reins in particular help inexperienced riders and young horses alike with their basic training. If the triangle rein is buckled correctly, it enables the horse to respond evenly to the rider. This allows the horse to balance itself better, even under beginner riders, and the rider has the opportunity to concentrate on their seat and aids. Draw reins do not belong in the hands of inexperienced riders. They are mostly used as corrective reins, as they bring the horse into a certain head and neck posture.

Triangle reins for ponies and horses

Whether you are looking for a triangle rein for horses, a triangle rein for shetties or thoroughbreds, the construction of the auxiliary rein is always identical. For warmbloods, the bridle rein is about 2.5 metres long and splits at one end. All three ends have adjustable loops. For faster handling, there are triangle reins with snap hooks. The one-piece end is attached to the saddle girths or lunging girth between the front legs. The split end runs from the inside to the outside through the bit rings and back to the girth, creating the triangle of the reins that gives them their name. 

Triangle reins in Cob or Full size differ only in their overall length. The Vienna reins are available in different materials. However, our experience with triangle reins shows that leather triangle reins have proven to be the most popular. However, triangle reins made of cord are also popular, and they are usually a little cheaper than the classic brown triangle reins made of pure leather. 

Correctly fitting the triangle reins

If you want to fit the triangle reins correctly, you should make sure that they run at about the same height as your horse's nose joint. The correct length of the triangle reins can be recognised by the forehead-nose line, which must remain slightly ahead of the vertical. The directional effect of the triangle rein restricts your horse laterally and at the same time enables the forward-downward movement. Correct reining is a basic requirement for riding with triangle reins, because this is the only way to prevent your horse from moving onto the forequarters. The same applies to lunging with triangle reins

Triangle reins, yes or no?

The aim of any riding training is always to communicate with the horse without auxiliary reins and to influence it sensitively. An auxiliary rein is therefore not intended for permanent use. However, a correctly applied triangle rein offers the horse a secure framework for leaning and at the same time sufficient freedom of movement in the neck. When used in experienced hands, it can be an excellent aid on the way to basic training.  

Draw reins for horses

The draw rein for ponies and horses is an auxiliary rein, but unlike the triangle rein, the side reins or the martingales, it is not a side rein, but a corrective rein. For some it is an irreplaceable aid, others demand that the draw reins be banned. The draw reins are only about 2.5 metres long, closed reins with a loop or snap hook at the end to attach them to the saddle girth. The classic leather draw reins are usually black to match the regular reins. In the meantime, however, there are also fancy brown draw reins, webbing draw reins and somewhat cheaper draw reins with a cord

Correctly buckling the draw reins 

The draw reins are usually attached to the saddle girth. From there they run between the front legs to the bit rings. The rein is passed through the bit rings from the inside to the outside and ends directly in the rider's hand. The rider's hand is therefore responsible for the force exerted on the horse's mouth. When the draw reins are picked up, the horse's nose is pulled towards the chest. The effect of the draw reins is then comparable to that of a pulley. The force applied is twice as strong on the horse's mouth, which can lead to pain and injury. Therefore, draw reins should never be used by inexperienced hands, and the combination of draw reins with lever bits, curb bits or pelhams is an absolute no-go.

Holding the reins correctly

To avoid forcing the horse into a position where it is restrained, the main pressure when riding with draw reins should always be on the actual reins. Ideally, you should hold the draw reins so that they are slightly slack. In order to allow the correction reins to slide easily through the hands, draw reins without stops are usually used.

The use of draw reins

The draw reins have absolutely no place with beginner riders and young horses. You should also refrain from using draw reins in cross-country and on uneven ground, as this increases the risk of injury. Draw reins for jumping are even banned. It is also not advisable to use draw reins for lunging, as they cannot be securely fastened to the saddle girth or lunging girth. The corrective rein therefore belongs at most in the hands of an experienced and sensitive rider. The horse should also be trained to the point where it is self-supporting and collection is possible. The draw rein can then help to restrict the horse upwards in a controlled manner, but it must never be used to pull the nose downwards. 

At Horze you will find a wide range of triangle reins and draw reins, but also gogues for horses and other auxiliary and replacement reins such as side reins, martingales and balance reins. Discover great brands like Karlslund and Kavalkade.

 

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